Political Economy Archives - ROAPE
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Political Economy Tag

In this blogpost Christiaan De Beukelaer and Martin Fredriksson contribute to roape.net’s ongoing discussion on fraud, economic trickery and crime in Africa today by initiating a critical discussion about the war on piracy. Ghana’s economy might look like a success story with a continuously growing GDP, but the statistics actually hide growing inequalities which also creates stronger breeding grounds for informal markets of various kinds....

In this blogpost roape.net publishes the first in a series of short interviews conducted at the ROAPE workshop held in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania (16-17 April, 2018). Over two days debates explored contemporary activism, resistance and research across the continent. We hope the posts on roape.net will continue the discussions started in Accra and Dar and draw in other voices....

In this extract from the editorial of our quarterly journal (Vol. 44, Issue 154) editor Tunde Zack-Williams discusses papers on Kenyan politics, debt and neoliberalism on the continent, gender oppression in Egypt and the collapse of Zimbabwe’s military and the intervention in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The editorial introduces the issue in the context of the Mugabe’s fall from power, Zuma removal from the presidency and the recent elections in Sierra Leone. ...

A recent ROAPE blog provided evidence of some negative impacts of the agricultural reform in Rwanda, and several ROAPE articles have critiqued claims of success. Chris Huggins author of a new book, Agricultural Reform in Rwanda: Authoritarianism, Markets and Zones of Governance, critically examines the political economy of contemporary agricultural reform in Rwanda....

Heike Becker writes about the recent European Conference on African Studies (ECAS) in Basel, Switzerland, the 7th of the now well-established bi-annual gatherings of the European African Studies network AEGIS. Becker observes that epistemological queries were key to the conference, with important questions raised about how knowledge of the continent is produced. ...

My students make me much more optimistic about the future of Africa’s political economies. Unwilling to accept the criticism with which academics attack almost every actor involved in African development including politicians, businesspeople, international organisations and multilateral institutions, my students don’t just want to stand on the side-lines and analyse the problems, rather they want to get onto the pitch and find ways to change the world. This mission is particularly strong among my students from African countries, who see development, not as an abstract concept, but as a concrete and tangible future they want for their societies. Inspired by our students, this year, Thandika Mkandawire and I decided to ask our African Development course students at the LSE to write critical and thoughtful blog-posts about the most pressing issues concerning economic and social development within African countries. We then asked students to vote on the...

At a ROAPE organised workshop at the ASAUK in September on 'African capitalist society' speakers reflected on the state of scholarship on capitalism in Africa and the dynamic and development of capitalism on the continent. Kate Meagher (LSE), Stefan Ouma (Frankfurt) and Jesse Ovadia (Windsor) were speakers, and Jörg Wiegratz (Leeds) and Peter Lawrence (Keele) chairs. ...

Following a recent debate on 'African Capitalist Society' organised by Jörg Wiegratz of the Review of African Political Economy at the UK African Studies Association conference in Cambridge, Stefan Ouma continues the discussion on roape.net. As Ouma points out the historical context for such a debate is very different from the 1970s and 1980s – when ROAPE was at the forefront of scholarly discussions on this topic. Ouma argues passionately for a less holistic framing of the subject matter, talking in plural terms and avoiding linear, territorial, singular or transhistorical notions of 'capitalism'....