Economic trickery, fraud and crime in Africa Archives - ROAPE
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Economic trickery, fraud and crime in Africa

After the manifest failure of microcredit to address poverty in Africa and everywhere else, the international development community has hit upon a new microcredit-related idea that, it claims, will do the job this time around: ‘fin-tech’, i.e. financial technology. In this blogpost Milford Bateman argues fin-tech has the potential to gravely undermine the position of the poor and to increase inequality while, not coincidentally, vastly enriching a narrow elite. ...

In this blogpost Christiaan De Beukelaer and Martin Fredriksson contribute to roape.net’s ongoing discussion on fraud, economic trickery and crime in Africa today by initiating a critical discussion about the war on piracy. Ghana’s economy might look like a success story with a continuously growing GDP, but the statistics actually hide growing inequalities which also creates stronger breeding grounds for informal markets of various kinds....

In a blogpost jointly published with Tax Justice Network, Nataliya Mykhalchenko asks whether the emerging effort to curb both illicit financial flows and tax avoidance is a global fight and not just another global flight driven by certain powerful entities and interest groups trying to avoid paying tax. Given that the issue has universal significance and undermines the development of many countries in the Global South, more research (and campaigning) is needed in order to understand the nature of these initiatives and the forces behind them....

In a new book on the neoliberal moral economy in Africa, Jörg Wiegratz writes how there has been a high intensity of moral-economic interference of foreign, especially Western actors to promote a particular capitalist moral order in contemporary African societies. In this blog-post introducing his book, Wiegratz argues that the moral economy of a country is not just made by domestic but also foreign forces, and, that given morals are in many ways an outcome of politics....

In the second part of her investigation into Angola's oil giant Sonangol, Liliane Mouan returns to the ongoing restructuring and asks whether these reforms will deliver greater openness and transformation. As she concludes, 'Angola’s rulers are well aware that this international legitimacy requires a restructuring process that retains at least some semblance of integrity, even if it simply means putting the corruption somewhere else.'...

In the first of a two-part blog post Liliane Mouan looks to the restructuring of the Angolan oil sector and state oil company Sonangol. The country retains the image of an oil kleptocracy, with the fate of Sonangol tied to a political dynasty. This blog asks what do these reforms tell us about political-economic change in Angola?...

Neoliberal policies, reforms, ideas, social relations and practices have engendered a type of socio-cultural change across Africa (and the world) which is facilitating widespread fraud. In a new volume just published, editors Jörg Wiegratz and David Whyte and their contributing scholars explore the moral worlds of fraud in different social and geographical settings, and illustrates how contemporary fraud is not the outcome of just a few 'bad apples'....