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Martin Legassick's death has robbed us of an important Marxist political economist. ROAPE Online publishes his remarks prepared for the closing plenary of the World Association of Political Economy forum on 21 June, 2015 upon being awarded a Distinguished Achievement Award in Political Economy for the Twenty-First century....

Martin Legassick (20 December 1940 – 1 March 2016) was a revolutionary socialist, brilliant researcher, teacher and mentor. He was an outstanding scholar and a pioneer of radical revisionist history in South Africa and a comrade and contributor to ROAPE. Here we post tributes to him and links to some of his work....

Writer and activist Khadija Sharife describes the devastating practice of platinum price fixing. She sees how the role of the market in Africa as ‘sole regulator’ of value is kept in place for its fictive neutrality, its political-economic usefulness in not ‘seeing’ and therefore disguising socio-economic conflicts and injustices....

Patrick Bond writes how the World Bank is blinded by its own dogma and unable to see the extent of South African poverty.To do so would violate the Bank’s foundational doctrine, that states the central problems of poverty can be solved by applying market logic. It is only by breaking with the logic of the market that real gains can be made for South Africa's poor....

In a far-reaching analysis of the struggles taking place in South Africa, Jonathan Grossman writes that the student mobilisations have directly challenged the myth of the rainbow nation. Grossman also challenges a narrative that says students did for workers what workers could not do for themselves, in fact there is a deep solidarity between workers and students and this is the real spirit of Marikana....

Over the last three years Ben Radley has been working on a documentary, We Will Win Peace, which is a critique of campaigns often led by western advocacy groups on ‘conflict minerals’ in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, with their dominant narrative that has placed western consumers at the heart of the solution. In this blog Ben unpicks some of the issues involved. ...