Blog Archives - Page 8 of 11 - ROAPE
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Gary Littlejohn looks at the incredible research output of the radical Mozambican Instituto de Estudos Sociais e Economicos (IESE). The Institute has succeeded in organising nine annual conferences already under what have been at times difficult circumstances, run by a fairly small research unit that is entirely dependent on the funds that it raises through consultancy work and book sales, is remarkable....

ROAPE's Alastair Fraser writes about the recent contested elections in Zambia. He explains that without mobilized social movements making demands on the state, without mass-membership political parties which represent substantive political interests and projects, without citizens excited by a belief in the possibility of transforming the country, gains in formal rights – to free association, to freedom of expression - are easily pushed aside....

Christopher Webb argues that while the South African state has increased social welfare to the poorest it has also facilitated the expansion of a predatory form of finance targeting those same people. Webb reveals how social grants and their delivery has facilitated the emergence of predatory forms of micro-lending that targets the poor....

In reflections on her fieldwork in South Africa, Asanda Benya writes about the difficulties and insights she gained while researching underground female mine-workers. Asanda argues that maintaining a distance, or being detached, was not a possible or morally available option, her research demanded that she became fully immersed in the lives of those being studied. ...

ROAPE’s Tunde Zack-Williams provides a detailed background to the war in Sierra Leone that led to British intervention in 2000, he then introduces Lionel Cliffe's paper on Tony Blair's involvement in the country in 2000 which roape.net publishes for the first time. As Zack-Williams concludes, ‘Lionel’s paper … questions: in whose interests do we intervene in conflicts in foreign land? Are we in a position to always tell the good guys from the bad guys?’...

Luke Sinwell and Siphiwe Mbatha spent two years researching the contemporary mine-workers’ movement in South Africa and in their new book, The Spirit of Marikana: The Rise of Insurgent Trade Unionism in South Africa, they detail the creation of an alternative structure which was intended to hold the ‘new’ union, the Association of Mine-workers and Construction Union (AMCU), accountable to the rank and file. ...

Graham Harrison writes how Africa shows the world a future capitalism, one in which the social relations of production are far more extensively defined by contingency, violence, struggle, fraud, unfree labour, environmental pillage, and the politics of organised chaos. Capitalism is as resilient as it is unstable, but there is hope once the process of breaking it down begins. ...

Leo Zeilig's blog looks at the events that took place in Burkina Faso during and immediately after the military coup in September last year. The defeat of the coup was the result of extraordinary protests and popular struggles; Burkina Faso's second uprising in less than a year. ...