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Struggle Tag

In this blogpost roape.net publishes the first in a series of short interviews conducted at the ROAPE workshop held in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania (16-17 April, 2018). Over two days debates explored contemporary activism, resistance and research across the continent. We hope the posts on roape.net will continue the discussions started in Accra and Dar and draw in other voices....

In a strong defence of Critical Agrarian Studies, Bettina Engels and Kristina Diez write that the approach offers analytical potential for the investigation of further dimensions of structural transformation in the countryside beyond the agrarian sector. Critical Agrarian Studies enables us to put the analysis of mining and related conflicts in a broader global historical context of commodity exploitation and frontier expansion....

In a debate on roape.net, David Harvey replies to John Smith’s critique of his work. Marxism, Harvey argues, must not start with concepts and then impose them on reality, but with the realities on the ground. To start with concepts, as does John Smith, is to engage in rank idealism. Harvey challenges what he describes as ‘Smith’s crude and rigid theory of imperialism.’...

In a major rethinking of African workers in Europe Faisal Garba argues that precarity is nothing new, and must be approached as a continuation of a longstanding process, the understanding of which cannot be limited to contemporary capitalism but to the very nature of capitalism. Capitalism as the global politico-economic order is responsible for the desperation that drives migration, and the impoverishment of working class people everywhere. The experiences of the Global South, Garba argues, are spreading across Europe....

Written in 1978 from inside a Mozambican prison camp Wilfred Mhanda’s devastating Treatise, published for the first time with roape.net, exposes the reality of Zimbabwe’s so-called war for liberation. Known by his nom de guerre, Dzinashe ‘Dzino’ Machingura, Dzino explains that the guiding principle of the Zimbabwean nationalist movement was the pursuit of personal and clique power and not the attainment of revolutionary ideals. Mhanda presents an extraordinary, critical view of the liberation struggle, providing a Fanonian analysis of the role of the so-called liberators of contemporary Zimbabwe. This invaluable, unpublished text is introduced by David Moore. ...

In the first of a two part article on the struggle of Mozambique’s workers and poor, Judith Marshall writes about the experiment in radical transformation in the first years of the country’s independence after 1975. However the tragic slide in the 1980s into the arms of the IMF and World Bank saw the adoption of structural adjustment. Marshall charts the birth of new protest movements against the government and international capital....

In the afterword to the series Radical Agendas in South Africa, John Saul reflects on the essays that have appears over the last two months. In conclusion he asserts, as the contributors to this series have confirmed, the struggle continues in South Africa and that ROAPE (in both hard-copy and virtual format) must continue to report upon and bear witness to....

In this exploration of solidarity Graham Harrison seeks to go beyond the stultifying formality of cultural relativism and the universalisms of liberalism and social justice. He suggests that more pragmatic and situated approaches to solidarity and struggle would repay far better than searches for the universally-agreed code for a global struggle of the kind that was pervasive during the Cold War. ...