Social Movements Archives - ROAPE
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Social Movements Tag

Njuki Githethwa discusses a recent workshop in Nairobi of activists and researchers on social movements in East and Southern Africa. The workshop set itself the task of asking a number of questions. How do social movements build and sustain resistance? What should the relationship between scholars and activists look like? What role can universities play in building and sustaining connections among social movement scholars and activists? Githethwa argues that the analysis and understanding that came out of the workshop provided rich ammunition for scholars and activists to transform protests across the continent into struggles for radical and lasting transformation.  ...

ROAPE’s Leo Zeilig interviews the Kenyan activist Gacheke Gachihi who is the coordinator of the Mathare Social Justice Centre in Nairobi, which organises campaigns against police brutality and killings. He speaks about the struggles over the last twenty five years against police brutality and extra-judicial killings in Nairobi and some of the organisations and social movements that are confronting the Kenyan state on this issue. Gacheke also introduces an extraordinary short documentary, just released, which charts the campaigns against these killings, from within Nairobi’s poorest settlements. ...

Tin Hinane El Kadi writes about a revolutionary movement in Algeria which poses a real threat to the survival of the regime. She describes a young generation determined to go beyond the usual arrangements between parties and the establishment to produce radical change. The slogan in the streets is ‘El Chaab yourid isskat ennidam’ – ‘The people want to bring down the system.’...

Early in the year Donald Trump described various South American, Caribbean and (apparently all) African countries as ‘shitholes’ during a meeting on immigration with senators in the White House. ROAPE’s Reginald Cline-Cole argues that the comment reminds us of the continued need to provide radical analyses of trends, issues and social processes in Africa, with a particular interest in class dynamics and social movements and the meaning of capitalism and imperialism. He hopes that the journal and the website will be read as a demonstration of the sustained vitality of Marxist analysis....

David Seddon writes that seven years after the revolution many Tunisians have lost faith in the ‘democratic transition’ that they hoped would bring wider prosperity. This year a wave of popular protest broke out in the second week of January sparked by a package of tax increases after the government had received ‘a nudge’ from the IMF. At the height of the protests, it was estimated that tens of thousands of people were involved. Seddon examines the recent history of protest and struggle in Tunisia, the revolution in 2011, and the local elections held at the beginning of this month. ...

April marks the 25th anniversary of the deaths of Oliver Tambo and Chris Hani, though both men held very different visions for what transformation in South Africa ought to look like they found a home within the ANC. Alex Beresford argues that Tambo and Hani would have been disgusted by how patronage politics and corruption have generated internecine factionalism within the ANC and the wider alliance....

Recent protest in Togo have seen clashes with the police and a certain amount of street violence, but the scale has been unprecedented, with organisers claiming that as many as 800,000 people took to the streets across the country in August 2017. In the latest issue in the series David Seddon looks at the background to the latest wave of popular protests to rock West Africa. ...

In this issue of Popular Protest and Class Struggle in Africa, David Seddon reviews the most recent developments in four countries he has recently discussed – Gambia, Equatorial Guinea, Zimbabwe and the DRC – in all of which long-standing leaders have refused to stand down, in some cases against growing internal opposition and external pressure, but with significantly differing outcomes....

One of the central concerns of our roape.net project on popular protests in Africa is to provide an appreciation of the extent to which the instances of popular protest and social movement can increase the scope for sustainable social, economic and political development, and even, on occasion to contribute to the transformation of the very conditions of continental political and economic life. In this post we republish an important article by François Houtart assessing the problems (and lessons) from South America of building a post-neoliberal alternative....