Senegal Archives - ROAPE
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Senegal Tag

The Editorial Working Group of Review of African Political Economy (ROAPE) is pleased to announce the 2017 winner of the Ruth First prize. The prize is awarded for the best article published by an African author in the journal in a publication year. This year, the prize was awarded to Papa Faye for his article The Politics of Recognition, and the Manufacturing of Citizenship and Identity in Senegal's Decentralised Charcoal Market. The ROAPE Prize Committee commented on Faye's article: ‘the fieldwork contribution was impressive, as was the broader engagement with literature on identity politics and recognition. The paper’s discussion of how national policies (however they were conceived) were shaped within the local political economy was sensitively done, and very interesting.’ The article shows how state politics of (re)allocation of rights and resources to social groups within a society (recognition) are constructive of distinct abilities to shape the fate of the political...

Remi Adekoya interviews Pascal Bianchini about Senegal’s street fighting years from 1968 to the mid-1970s. It was a period of growth for the revolutionary left and it forced a multi-party system on the government of Léopold Senghor, which at the time was not that usual in Africa. Bianchini argues that the democratisation in the country started in 1968 and was driven by the left, leading to major political changes in subsequent decades....

For most commentators and scholars, it was only events in the Global North that constituted ‘Global 1968’. None of the relevant overviews brings related events on the African continent to the fore. In a detailed account of popular protest across Africa in the 1960s, it becomes clear that the decade was vital for activists – as it was elsewhere across the world. 1968 was a crucial year for popular protests and student militancy on the continent. roape.net begins to fill in the blanks in the story of ‘1968’ in a global perspective. ...

Heike Becker writes about the many uprisings in Africa’s 1968 and that these protests and revolts highlight the fact that Africa should not be left blank on the map of scholarship that seeks to understand 1968 in a global perspective. Yet, these revolts and protests are still forgotten in the global discourse of commemoration. This week roape.net will focus on the extraordinary African dimensions of the movements in 1968....

Ndongo Samba Sylla argues that the CFA franc - officially created on 26 December 1945 by a decree of General de Gaulle - used across much of Africa today is a colonial relics. For those hoping to export competitive products, obtain affordable credit, work for the integration of continental trade, or fight for an Africa free from imperialist control, the CFA franc is an anachronism demanding orderly and methodical elimination....

In this issue of Popular Protest and Class Struggle in Africa, David Seddon reviews the most recent developments in four countries he has recently discussed – Gambia, Equatorial Guinea, Zimbabwe and the DRC – in all of which long-standing leaders have refused to stand down, in some cases against growing internal opposition and external pressure, but with significantly differing outcomes....

Hours before the deadline Senegal maintains its troops are ready to intervene if Gambia’s President Jammeh refuses to hand over power. Jammeh has replied that he would not be intimidated, and the regional body ECOWAS had no right to interfere in The Gambia's affairs. David Seddon looks at the elections last month and the current crisis....

ROAPE's Hannah Cross introduces the new special issue on women, which deepens our understanding of women’s mobilisations in Africa and elsewhere. It also urges attention to gender relations in the analysis of contestations over land, labour, political rights and other forms of protest....

'The revolution won't be televised' is a film that tells the story of the ‘Y’en a marre’ movement that rose up in Senegal against octogenarian President Abdoulaye Wade’s attempt to clinch to power in 2012. Y’en a marre translates as ‘enough is enough’, or – even more to the point – ‘we’re fed up’. The movement was started by musicians Thiat and Kilifeu, and some of their friends. ...