Poverty Archives - Page 3 of 3 - ROAPE
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Poverty Tag

Cape Town's water crisis is caused by both global environmental politics and local mismanagement. It is also a matter of social inequality in neoliberal post-apartheid South Africa. In this personal look at the crisis, Heike Becker writes about how the water shortage has exposed the country's deep racial and class inequalities. ...

Supported by major international donors, the Rwandan government has lofty ambitions to modernise the agrarian and land sector. These reforms are part of a broader call to implement a Green Revolution across Africa. The authors of this blogpost insist on a more nuanced, in-depth and multi-faceted approach in order to understand the distance between centrally-planned policies and the realities of rural livelihoods....

Continuing the debate about Rwandan poverty statistics, Sam Desiere argues that with an inflation rate of 30% - which is more in line with ‘real’ inflation - poverty has increased in Rwanda. His findings raise concerns, not only for Rwanda’s (rural) policies (and poor), but also for international donors that have presented Rwanda as a model for development....

The Rwandan government has used its record on poverty reduction and economic growth to legitimize its authoritarian rule and to deflect criticism of its human rights record, just as the previous regime had done up until 1990. Yet as this blogpost shows despite official statistics poverty has actually increased in the country between 5% and 7% points between 2010 and 2014....

Christopher Webb argues that while the South African state has increased social welfare to the poorest it has also facilitated the expansion of a predatory form of finance targeting those same people. Webb reveals how social grants and their delivery has facilitated the emergence of predatory forms of micro-lending that targets the poor....

Patrick Bond writes how the World Bank is blinded by its own dogma and unable to see the extent of South African poverty.To do so would violate the Bank’s foundational doctrine, that states the central problems of poverty can be solved by applying market logic. It is only by breaking with the logic of the market that real gains can be made for South Africa's poor....

Abiodun Olamosu and Andy Wynne review Africa: Why the Economist Got it Wrong. They argue that the book provides a critical review of the recent economic history of Africa. Morten Jerven argues that, for most of the past two decades, mainstream economists have been trying to explain the chronic failure of economic growth in Africa. They have largely failed....

The first essay in our special issue on Radical Agendas in South Africa argues that the liberation struggle that culminated in 1994 and saw the emergence of a formally democratic South Africa and a population apparently liberated from oppression and, theoretically, from penury, has not been, in its essentials, so very liberatory after all. In subsequent essays, Vishwas Satgar, Shireen Hassim and others write about South Africa's radical possibilities....