NUMSA Archives - ROAPE
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NUMSA Tag

In this blogpost Zimbabwean socialist Munyaradzi Gwisai unpicks the situation in South Africa. He explains that the working class and poor must avoid the dangers of both Zuma’s ‘fake left-turn’ and the Zuma Must Fall protests. What are the lessons, Gwisai asks, for South Africa from the movement that rose-up against Mugabe in Zimbabwe in the late 1990s?...

Firoze Manji writes that discontent has been growing across the continent, with spontaneous eruptions and mass uprisings that have in some cases resulted in the overthrow of regimes. In such circumstances, one would have thought that this would have been fertile grounds for the emergence of strong left working class movements across the continent. But why has this not happened?...

In the first of a two part article on the struggle of Mozambique’s workers and poor, Judith Marshall writes about the experiment in radical transformation in the first years of the country’s independence after 1975. However the tragic slide in the 1980s into the arms of the IMF and World Bank saw the adoption of structural adjustment. Marshall charts the birth of new protest movements against the government and international capital....

In the afterword to the series Radical Agendas in South Africa, John Saul reflects on the essays that have appears over the last two months. In conclusion he asserts, as the contributors to this series have confirmed, the struggle continues in South Africa and that ROAPE (in both hard-copy and virtual format) must continue to report upon and bear witness to....

In the third installment of our series Radical Agendas in South Africa, Eddie Webster asks if left activists in the labour movement have the political imagination and energy to take advantage of the new terrain that has opened in recent years. What is clear, he writes, is that the old labour order is no longer sustainable ...