National Liberation Archives - ROAPE
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National Liberation Tag

In a major article published in ROAPE, and now available to access for free, Matteo Capasso re-frames the war in Libya by showing how US-led imperialism underlies the ongoing war and militarism that have contributed to the destruction of the country. In this blogpost, Capasso argues that war, militarism and killing have imposed themselves as new mechanisms of social reproduction and capital accumulation at the global level....

David Moore reflects on Robert Mugabe's life, politics and ZANU-PF. He sees Mugabe’s rule containing a blend of stultified Marxism and liberalism – a kind of ‘market Stalinism’. Discussing the coup that toppled Mugabe in 2017, Moore sees continuity in Zimbabwe’s liberation history. He asks, to what extent is this constant history of near-coups and coup-paranoia wired into the very structures of Zimbabwe’s political sociology and culture of class and state formation?...

On the sixtieth anniversary of the publication of Frantz Fanon’s 1959 classic, A Dying Colonialism, Ken Olende considers Fanon’s complex relationship to class and Marxism. Fanon wrote during a period of intense anti-colonial struggle where links with Marxist ideas were taken for granted. Olende argues Fanon’s work was grounded in a deep understanding of capitalist society....

In a major interview ROAPE’s Hakim Adi discusses his work, activism and politics. Adi has spent year’s researching the African diaspora, Pan-Africanism and communism in the 20th century. On the anniversary of the 1917 revolution he explains that the significance of 1917 is not so much as how it helps us understand the past, or as a way of understanding Africa’s history, but rather that it shows that the alternative can be created in the present and future....

Written in 1978 from inside a Mozambican prison camp Wilfred Mhanda’s devastating Treatise, published for the first time with roape.net, exposes the reality of Zimbabwe’s so-called war for liberation. Known by his nom de guerre, Dzinashe ‘Dzino’ Machingura, Dzino explains that the guiding principle of the Zimbabwean nationalist movement was the pursuit of personal and clique power and not the attainment of revolutionary ideals. Mhanda presents an extraordinary, critical view of the liberation struggle, providing a Fanonian analysis of the role of the so-called liberators of contemporary Zimbabwe. This invaluable, unpublished text is introduced by David Moore. ...

Miles Larmer reviews Lara Pawson's In the Name of the People, seeing in the book an exploration of the disillusionment with African national liberation. These are lessons, Miles writes, that continue to be highly instructive for many of us today...

The first essay in our special issue on Radical Agendas in South Africa argues that the liberation struggle that culminated in 1994 and saw the emergence of a formally democratic South Africa and a population apparently liberated from oppression and, theoretically, from penury, has not been, in its essentials, so very liberatory after all. In subsequent essays, Vishwas Satgar, Shireen Hassim and others write about South Africa's radical possibilities....