Exploitation Archives - ROAPE
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Exploitation Tag

In a strong defence of Critical Agrarian Studies, Bettina Engels and Kristina Diez write that the approach offers analytical potential for the investigation of further dimensions of structural transformation in the countryside beyond the agrarian sector. Critical Agrarian Studies enables us to put the analysis of mining and related conflicts in a broader global historical context of commodity exploitation and frontier expansion....

In a robust defence of his arguments, John Smith continues to challenge David Harvey’s understanding of global capitalism and imperialism. Many important changes have shaken the world in the last thirty years, but imperialist Europe and North America continue to drain wealth from Latin America and Africa, as well as from parts of Asia. Yet China’s growing challenge to imperialist domination and the spread of global capitalist depression means that we no longer live in a post-World War II world, we live in a pre-World War III world. Harvey’s compass on these developments remains profoundly faulty. ...

In this blogpost Horman Chitonge focuses on the question of whether African societies can be classified as capitalist or not. He argues that the answer one gives, depends, largely, on the meaning of capitalism that one adopts and there have been different meanings which researchers and writers have espoused for decades. Chitonge details some of the debates. ...

Following a recent debate on 'African Capitalist Society' organised by Jörg Wiegratz of the Review of African Political Economy at the UK African Studies Association conference in Cambridge, Stefan Ouma continues the discussion on roape.net. As Ouma points out the historical context for such a debate is very different from the 1970s and 1980s – when ROAPE was at the forefront of scholarly discussions on this topic. Ouma argues passionately for a less holistic framing of the subject matter, talking in plural terms and avoiding linear, territorial, singular or transhistorical notions of 'capitalism'....

With the launch of our our new website we reflect on how the Review of African Political Economy was established in 1974. ROAPE was founded with the aim to ‘examine the roots of Africa’s present condition’ and problems such as inequality and dependency. Yet, the Review did not seek to promote scholarly research for its own sake, but instead sought to engage with the actions required for transformation. ...