Dependency Theory Archives - ROAPE
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Dependency Theory Tag

In a major critique of dependency theory, Esteban Mora continues the debate on the nature of imperialism on roape.net (and specifically the blogpost by Walter Daum). He argues that while inequalities and unevenness in the world market exists, with both strong nation-states and weaker ones, this is not a division based on countries or regions, nor geography or ethnicity, but on relations of production. We must unearth the mechanisms of mutual profiting across all regions to see a class divided world market, as part of an international system of states where every single state is an agent of financial capital....

Historical explanations advanced by Walter Rodney on early patterns of dependency resonate with contemporary social and economic realities of globalisation. Colonial legacies are very much alive and well across the African continent. In this blogpost Katie Barker argues that many of the old patterns of dependency prevail and illustrates the urgency to transform Africa’s structural position in the global economy, de-industrialisation and agricultural stagnation. ...

In a reply to Esteban Mora’s contribution to the imperialism debate on roape.net, Walter Daum writes that the claim that the drain of value from South to North has been inverted, reversed, or merely leveled off flies in the face of reality. Daum argues that the Northern imperialists exploit the labour and resources of the South and this is all the more true today....

Esteban Mora argues that the debate on roape.net between David Harvey and John Smith is flawed. We should not only be looking for a connection between ‘drained’ countries and countries who ‘drain’ others, but also a relationship of mutual profiting between an international bourgeoisie. Mora argues that dependency theories which underpins the debate are partial and cannot capture the totality of relationships in the international market, nor the operations of imperialism....

Christopher Hope argues that the dependency school, more than any other approach in economics, tried to understand economic development in a given location through an understanding of global capitalism. Yet today, he argues, such an international dimension is often lacking in the contemporary analysis of African economies. Is it time to return the dependency approach?...

Andy Wynne and Adefolarin A. Olamilekan review the new collection of essays 'Polarising Development: Alternatives to Neoliberalism and the Crisis.' They argue that many of the authors in the volume are creatively adapting the traditional tools to the current challenges of global inequalities within as much as between countries, to tackle issues such as climate change and the changing nature of imperialist competition....