China Archives - ROAPE
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China Tag

As Donald Trump makes his first visit to the UK as president, Dirk Kohnert looks at how his policies will hit African countries. After years of talk of partnership for African economic development Trump’s tariffs mean a severe blow to African trade and sustainable development. Kohnert argues that Egypt and South Africa for example, potentially the most affected countries in Africa, face massive job losses....

Abiodun Olamosu reviews the classic 1975 book, Economic Development of Nigeria: The Socialist Alternative by Ola Oni and Bade Onimode which will soon be republished. Oni and Onimode wrote about the underdevelopment of Nigeria and how the people were made poor. They also provided a programme for the country’s development which included the disengagement from international capitalism, the introduction of democratic planning, public ownership and control of the means of production, distribution and exchange. Olamosu provides a critical introduction to the book. ...

Responding to the debate on the changing nature of imperialism on roape.net, Walter Daum challenges Patrick Bond’s defence of David Harvey. Daum argues that while there is no question that the ‘East’ has gained relatively in wealth, this does not mean that there has been an epochal shift in the flow of value; it is extremely dubious that the directional flows of centuries have reversed and that the East, including China, is draining value from the West. ...

In a major contribution to the on-going debate on imperialism, Patrick Bond argues that an explanation of imperialist political-economy and geopolitics must incorporate subimperialisms. John Smith’s old-fashioned binary of North/South prevents him from fully engaging with David Harvey’s overall concern about uneven geographical development. ...

Continuing the debate between David Harvey and John Smith on imperialism and capitalism, Adam Mayer focuses on the fate of the subaltern and the excluded. The figure of the migrant who desires legal, social and cultural capital is at the centre of this blogpost and demonstrates how Harvey’s notions of the changing cores of global imperialism is fundamentally incorrect....

In a robust defence of his arguments, John Smith continues to challenge David Harvey’s understanding of global capitalism and imperialism. Many important changes have shaken the world in the last thirty years, but imperialist Europe and North America continue to drain wealth from Latin America and Africa, as well as from parts of Asia. Yet China’s growing challenge to imperialist domination and the spread of global capitalist depression means that we no longer live in a post-World War II world, we live in a pre-World War III world. Harvey’s compass on these developments remains profoundly faulty. ...

Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò and LaKeyma Pennyamon write about the explosive new film Black Panther. From the film they see a need to resuscitate debates about Pan-Africanism, unity and radical transformation in Africa and elsewhere. They argue that any serious Pan-Africanism will need to see a serious, structural, and permanent alteration in the distribution of resources and political power on a world scale. ...

In a debate on roape.net, David Harvey replies to John Smith’s critique of his work. Marxism, Harvey argues, must not start with concepts and then impose them on reality, but with the realities on the ground. To start with concepts, as does John Smith, is to engage in rank idealism. Harvey challenges what he describes as ‘Smith’s crude and rigid theory of imperialism.’...

Heike Becker reports on the important Rosa Luxemburg conference in Berlin, which focused on Africa. However, the conference left her feeling profoundly uneasy. How can an event that claims to “question power” on the continent ignore the popular movements, mostly of young people, against authoritarian regimes, against enduring racism, austerity, and myriad forms of social inequality? Whose power, she asks, is not questioned?...

The Review of African Political Economy is convening a series of three workshops in Africa in the 2017-18 period to explore Structural Transformations in Africa today: interventions from the Left. The workshops will help link analysis and activism in contemporary Africa from the perspective of radical political economy; consider whether a new politics is emerging from sites of contestation in Africa and reflect on lessons which might be drawn for the continent from revolutionary historical transitions....