Reviews - ROAPE
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Reviews

Reviews

ROAPE Online publishes reviews of academic and political books as well as fiction, exhibitions, social movement events and film. Our reviews examine the scholarly debates within Africa political economy, but can also focus on important cultural events taking place on the continent and elsewhere. The recommended length is 800 words or up to 2,000 for a review article of several books, films or events.

  • In a review of an important recent exhibition in Nairobi, Kenya, Craig Halliday writes that ‘Sensing Nairobi’ (8-30 June, 2017) sought to capture, reflect and define Nairobi’s ambiguous urban landscape....

  • In a review of an important recent book on the origins of capitalism, Andy Wynne argues that the authors provide an important introduction towards a truly global history of capitalism. The development of capitalism in Western Europe was possible because of its ‘backwardness’ and with the vital inputs and roles of a range of more advanced non-European societies. ...

  • In a world where the logic of capitalism forces the unemployed into precarious employment, yet insists that we all constantly ‘improve’ ourselves, Faisal Garba reviews two books that ask what is the role of knowledge production....

  • Harry Verhoeven praises the fine-grained analysis in a new book on Rwanda which has the potential to decisively move beyond widespread caricatures of Rwanda under RPF supremo Paul Kagame as either a ‘slowly democratising developmental state’ (as infatuated aid officials conveniently assert) or as a ‘totalitarian’ leader where no resistance is possible. Yet there are serious weaknesses that speak to the approach taken by the author....

  • #RhodesMustFall: Nibbling at Resilient Colonialism in South Africa is timely, balanced and informative, but aspects of the book will leave the reader craving more writes Simukai Chigudu....

  • In this review of a major new book on Nigeria, Naija Marxisms, Andy Wynne describes how Nigerian Marxist theory developed in the second half of the 20th century and still provides intellectual ammunition for the labour movement. As a tradition that is alive today, Wynne writes how Nigeria Marxists have analysed Nigeria as a capitalist country, embedded in a global capitalist economy, but affected by pre-colonial structures. ...

  • Andy Wynne and Adefolarin A. Olamilekan review the new collection of essays 'Polarising Development: Alternatives to Neoliberalism and the Crisis.' They argue that many of the authors in the volume are creatively adapting the traditional tools to the current challenges of global inequalities within as much as between countries, to tackle issues such as climate change and the changing nature of imperialist competition....

  • In November 1961 thirteen Italian airmen were murdered in the chaos of Congolese power struggles that followed independence from Belgium, the Italian artist Alberto Burri commemorated the men by producing a collage, Grande Sacco. Following a retrospective of Burri's art Meredeth Turshen considers the Italian, African and colonial history that lives behind Burri's work....

  • 'The revolution won't be televised' is a film that tells the story of the ‘Y’en a marre’ movement that rose up in Senegal against octogenarian President Abdoulaye Wade’s attempt to clinch to power in 2012. Y’en a marre translates as ‘enough is enough’, or – even more to the point – ‘we’re fed up’. The movement was started by musicians Thiat and Kilifeu, and some of their friends. ...

  • Meredeth Turshen reviews a recent exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan entitled, Kongo: Power and Majesty. She marvels at the extraordinary artistic production of Kongo society and asks, why were the Africans who created these instruments not honored as contemporaries of Michelangelo? Why didn’t Europeans regard the Kongo civilization as comparable to the Renaissance? Why did they reduce Africans to raw human labour?...