ROAPE Blog - ROAPE
15789
paged,page-template,page-template-blog-masonry,page-template-blog-masonry-php,page,page-id-15789,page-parent,paged-2,page-paged-2,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-child-theme-ver-1.0.0,qode-theme-ver-16.7,qode-theme-bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.5.2,vc_responsive

ROAPE Blog

Our Blog

ROAPE’s blog hosts short articles to highlight developments on the continent and comment on the dynamics of protest, shifting patterns of political economy and issues of historical concern for the journal. We welcome submissions for short articles between 800 and 1,800 words.

Heike Becker writes about the many uprisings in Africa’s 1968 and that these protests and revolts highlight the fact that Africa should not be left blank on the map of scholarship that seeks to understand 1968 in a global perspective. Yet, these revolts and protests are still forgotten in the global discourse of commemoration. This week roape.net will focus on the extraordinary African dimensions of the movements in 1968....

Sophia Price writes that the post-Brexit UK-Commonwealth relationship is being idealised as the means for delivering shared economic and political gains, abstracted from the violence of its colonial history and relations of subordination and domination on which it rests. Price argues that the British state sees its future role after Brexit as facilitating the expansion of markets for finance. ...

This blogpost by Meera Sabaratnam is based on her recent book 'Decolonising Intervention: International Statebuilding in Mozambique', which argues that by challenging forms of received wisdom or analysis one may challenge the unjust distributions of power that underpin them. Sabaratnam challenges the Eurocentric habits of analysis have characterised much of the literature on international statebuilding, that focuses principally on the interveners while obscuring the interpretations and viewpoints of the intended...

April marks the 25th anniversary of the deaths of Oliver Tambo and Chris Hani, though both men held very different visions for what transformation in South Africa ought to look like they found a home within the ANC. Alex Beresford argues that Tambo and Hani would have been disgusted by how patronage politics and corruption have generated internecine factionalism within the ANC and the wider alliance....

Lucien van der Walt and Peter Cole discuss a new collection, Wobblies of the World: A Global History of the IWW, that helps recover the story of an important generation of international revolutionaries who battled racial discrimination and repression. They look at a history of radical resistance to capitalism and racism—frequently by anarchists and syndicalists— which has often been ignored. ...

While Chinua Achebe resisted the crown foisted on him as the ‘father of African literature’, Remi Adekoya argues that this is most likely how popular history will remember the great Nigerian novelist, poet and scholar who passed away five years ago today. ...

In this extract from the editorial of our quarterly journal (Vol. 44, Issue 154) editor Tunde Zack-Williams discusses papers on Kenyan politics, debt and neoliberalism on the continent, gender oppression in Egypt and the collapse of Zimbabwe’s military and the intervention in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The editorial introduces the issue in the context of the Mugabe’s fall from power, Zuma removal from the presidency and the recent...

Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò and LaKeyma Pennyamon write about the explosive new film Black Panther. From the film they see a need to resuscitate debates about Pan-Africanism, unity and radical transformation in Africa and elsewhere. They argue that any serious Pan-Africanism will need to see a serious, structural, and permanent alteration in the distribution of resources and political power on a world scale. ...