Debates - ROAPE
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Debates

  • Following a recent debate on 'African Capitalist Society' organised by Jörg Wiegratz of the Review of African Political Economy at the UK African Studies Association conference in Cambridge, Stefan Ouma continues the discussion on roape.net. As Ouma points out the historical context for such a debate is very different from the 1970s and 1980s – when ROAPE was at the forefront of scholarly discussions on this topic. Ouma argues passionately for a less holistic framing of the subject matter, talking in plural terms and avoiding linear, territorial, singular or transhistorical notions of 'capitalism'....

  • Continuing our series on capitalism on the continent Kate Meagher writes how debates on industrial policy and the developmental state in Africa have directed attention to wider processes of class formation and economic transformation that seemed until recently to have fallen out of fashion. In this blog she looks at the transformation in the African working class....

  • In this far-reaching and provocative contribution to roape.net's debate on capitalism in Africa, Elísio Macamo argues that instead of discussing whether “Capitalism” as such is a valid concept or a useful description of social phenomena in Africa, we should interrogate how concepts developed in very specific times and places under specific circumstances can be usefully deployed in other settings. ...

  • For our series on capitalism in Africa, political economist Pádraig Carmody argues that although globalisation has ‘hollowed out’ the manufacturing base of many European and North American economies, in some parts of Africa there might be the possibility of connecting global production networks on relatively more favourable terms, which could assist industrialisation. ...

  • In this blogpost Horman Chitonge focuses on the question of whether African societies can be classified as capitalist or not. He argues that the answer one gives, depends, largely, on the meaning of capitalism that one adopts and there have been different meanings which researchers and writers have espoused for decades. Chitonge details some of the debates. ...

  • Christopher Hope argues that the dependency school, more than any other approach in economics, tried to understand economic development in a given location through an understanding of global capitalism. Yet today, he argues, such an international dimension is often lacking in the contemporary analysis of African economies. Is it time to return the dependency approach?...

  • Tinhinan El Kadi and Avelino Chimbulo argue that the current crisis in neoliberal globalisation, best represented by Donald Trump’s election as the US president, may result in an increase in policy space for African nations to engage in industrial policy....

  • The first installment of this three-part blogpost John Smith summarises evidence showing that, during the neoliberal era, African poverty has increased both absolutely and relative to the income and wealth of the average person in Europe and North America, notwithstanding the much-hyped rise of Africa’s middle class....