Conferences - ROAPE
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Conferences

Conferences

For many years ROAPE has held conferences, organised symposiums and activist workshops. The journal also funds bursaries and makes contributions towards conferences and other outreach events. This page also details ROAPE Online’s major intellectual outreach work, providing information on important and upcoming conferences and workshops in our monthly Conference List.

Reports

Regular, short reports will focus on reviewing the major themes and arguments in recent conferences and events that our members have attended. Please submit your reports of between 800 and 1,200 words to roape@outlook.com.

  • Laura Mann writes about a workshop on Africa’s growing youth populations. Participants discussed the challenge that African societies face in reimagining their economies and social policies in light of this demographic pressure. These pressures were not relieved by the recent economic boom within African countries which has been resource-intensive and “jobless”. ...

  • At a ROAPE organised workshop at the ASAUK in September on 'African capitalist society' speakers reflected on the state of scholarship on capitalism in Africa and the dynamic and development of capitalism on the continent. Kate Meagher (LSE), Stefan Ouma (Frankfurt) and Jesse Ovadia (Windsor) were speakers, and Jörg Wiegratz (Leeds) and Peter Lawrence (Keele) chairs. ...

  • Heike Becker writes about the recent European Conference on African Studies (ECAS) in Basel, Switzerland, the 7th of the now well-established bi-annual gatherings of the European African Studies network AEGIS. Becker observes that epistemological queries were key to the conference, with important questions raised about how knowledge of the continent is produced. ...

  • For a conference to be held later this year in Dakar, Senegal, The Revolutionary Left in Sub-Saharan Africa, the organisers argue that a political and social history of these movements must be written. The call for papers invites researchers and activists to submit proposals to attend this important conference....

  • Peter Lawrence's report on the workshop, 'Employment, Structural Transformation and Equitable Economic Development in Africa' co-sponsored by ROAPE and Third World Network on 20-22 July, 2015, in Accra, Ghana....

  • Carin Runciman reports on a recent workshop that focused on protests in South Africa. Based on research conducted by the Research Chair in Social Change she shows that these protests are not just about service delivery, but amount to a rebellion of the poor. However, to what extent can these protests break from the politics of the ANC and form a progressive movement for social change?...

  • In this report on an important workshop held at Jimma University in Ethiopia, the authors look at the opportunities for the decolonization of knowledge. This detailed reflection holds important lessons and examples for readers of roape.net, who share a commitment to radical and critical scholarship of and from the continent and who are likewise immersed in decolonizing projects in their respective spaces and institutions. ...

  • The Review of African Political Economy is convening a series of three workshops in Africa in the 2017-18 period to explore Structural Transformations in Africa today: interventions from the Left. The workshops will help link analysis and activism in contemporary Africa from the perspective of radical political economy; consider whether a new politics is emerging from sites of contestation in Africa and reflect on lessons which might be drawn for the continent from revolutionary historical transitions....

  • Mpumelelo Tshabalala discusses a symposium that marked the 60th anniversary of the All Africa People’s Conference which was hosted at the University of London last month. The symposium created the space for reflection on the historical significance of the 1958 AAPC and on how it can be used to understand and shape where Africa is today. Tshabalala also raises some important questions about race and politics at the event. By Mpumelelo Tshabalala On Thursday, 6 December 2018 the All Africa People’s Conference’s (AAPC) 60-year commemorative event took place in one of Senate House Library’s grand, parliamentary styled rooms.  The symposium was incredibly rich, evident in the effort made to set and comprehend the context of the original conference in 1958. Further to the presented content, accompanying the programme was a list of the AAPC’s delegates, fraternal delegates and observers, a 1958 map of the continent......

  • Heike Becker reports on the important Rosa Luxemburg conference in Berlin, which focused on Africa. However, the conference left her feeling profoundly uneasy. How can an event that claims to “question power” on the continent ignore the popular movements, mostly of young people, against authoritarian regimes, against enduring racism, austerity, and myriad forms of social inequality? Whose power, she asks, is not questioned?...

  • In February this year, during a protest against the lack of accommodation for poor students in Cape Town, South Africa, students and members of the #RhodesMustFall movement set alight paintings considered to be ‘colonial artwork’. In a conversation with the artist Faith Pienaar, anti-apartheid activist and judge Albie Sachs reflects on the meaning of art in troubled post-apartheid South Africa. ...

  • In this brief report Elisa Greco looks at the main themes of the Planetary Natures conference (Binghamton University, 9-11 July 2015) that looked at how capitalism depends on appropriations of cheap natures....

  • Reviewing an important recent workshop on ‘Moral Economies, Economic Moralities’, Jörg Wiegratz argues that the contemporary state of the world, and the decades-long inattention of critical social science to aspects of morality in capitalism, call for a significant increase in scholarly work on the moral dimensions of global capitalism. ...

  • In his report on the historic two-day conference for socialism that took place in South Africa on 16 and 17 April, 2015, Ashley Fataar reports that 150 delegates from ten socialist organisations, two anti-capitalist organisations and eight trade unions attended from across the country....

  • In October scholars and archivists on Africa came together in Lusaka, Zambia, for a workshop on the theme of “Endangered and Post-Colonial Archives in Eastern and Southern Africa.” Co-organised by the Southern African Institute for Policy and Research (SAIPAR) and the British Institute in Eastern Africa (BIEA), and part-funded by the Review of African Political Economy (ROAPE) the workshop explored the challenges and realities of preserving “endangered” material in Eastern and Southern Africa, and to plan and discuss practical steps that could be taken now and for the future to preserve and promote endangered historical material in the region....

  • To commemorate the 60th anniversary of the first All-African Peoples´ Conference in Ghana in 1958, the Institute of African Studies at the University of Ghana organized a conference under the theme ‘Revisiting the 1958 All-African Peoples´ Conference: The Unfinished Business of Liberation and Transformation’ which took place at the beginning of December last year in Accra. Zuzana Uhde describes how the conference evoked and celebrated the spirit of Pan-Africanism and socialism and debated vital questions of radical political economy....

  • Njuki Githethwa discusses a recent workshop in Nairobi of activists and researchers on social movements in East and Southern Africa. The workshop set itself the task of asking a number of questions. How do social movements build and sustain resistance? What should the relationship between scholars and activists look like? What role can universities play in building and sustaining connections among social movement scholars and activists? Githethwa argues that the analysis and understanding that came out of the workshop provided rich ammunition for scholars and activists to transform protests across the continent into struggles for radical and lasting transformation.  ...

  • Jörg Wiegratz, lecturer in the Political Economy of Global Development at the University of Leeds and a member of the editorial board of ROAPE, reports on 14th Biennal Conference of the European Association of Social Anthropologists (EASA) Milan, 20-23 July, 2016 ...

  • In an important conference on agriculture in North Africa speakers sought to confront the central issue of our time: delivering accessible and available food to the world’s poor in a way that is sustainable for the planet. Many speakers argued that food sovereignty through delinking from global commodity chains might be the answer....

  • ROAPE’s Jörg Wiegratz discusses a conference in Hungary that pulled together African studies associations across much of Eastern Europe. It was an opportunity for important connections between researchers in the region and Africa. In a selection of interviews from the conference Jörg asks about the dynamics of research for Africanists across Eastern Europe.  ...

  • Amber Murrey and Edith Phaswana write about a conference in Ibadan marking the contribution of the scholar Toyin Falola. Falola’s work transcends disciplinary boundaries, appealing to researchers and students across different backgrounds and disciplines. Murrey and Phaswana explain that Falola has been at the forefront of charting a path for African intellectuals and validating humanizing accounts of African history....

  • David Simon has put together this compilation of reports from the JSAS and RoAPE First Biennial Conference, Southern Africa Beyond the West, held in Livingstone in August 2015. We have also included a number of videos of sessions, keynote addresses and interviews with participants....

  • Marking the 60th anniversary of the All African People’s Conference in Accra in 1958 December 2018 marks the 60th anniversary of the All African People’s Conference (AAPC), which was held in Accra, Ghana, between 5 and 13 December 1958. Under the slogan ‘Hands off Africa!!’, the AAPC was a watershed moment in the history of Africa’s liberation from colonial rule and white supremacy. To mark its significance, a major one day conference was held on 6 December 2018 at the University of London by the Institute of Commonwealth Studies (ICWS), School of Advanced Study, and Westminster United Nations Association, under the title of ‘Hands Off Africa!!’ The 1958 All African People’s Conference: Its Impact Then and Now’. By Mandy Banton, David Wardrop and Susan Williams The AAPC was inspired by Dr Kwame Nkrumah, Prime Minister of newly-independent Ghana, and George Padmore, Nkrumah’s Adviser on African......