Popular protest and class struggle across the continent Archives - ROAPE
138
archive,category,category-popular-protest-and-class-struggle-across-the-continent,category-138,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-child-theme-ver-1.0.0,qode-theme-ver-16.8,qode-theme-bridge,qode_header_in_grid,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.5.2,vc_responsive

Popular protest and class struggle across the continent

In the latest installment of the protest and social movement project on roape.net, David Seddon writes about recent developments in Burundi. He argues that President Pierre Nkurunziza’s brutal efforts to extend his rule have temporarily swept aside internal dissent and unrest. Across the continent the effectiveness of those struggling against such anti-democratic moves has varied considerably. ...

David Seddon writes that seven years after the revolution many Tunisians have lost faith in the ‘democratic transition’ that they hoped would bring wider prosperity. This year a wave of popular protest broke out in the second week of January sparked by a package of tax increases after the government had received ‘a nudge’ from the IMF. At the height of the protests, it was estimated that tens of thousands of people were involved. Seddon examines the recent history of protest and struggle in Tunisia, the revolution in 2011, and the local elections held at the beginning of this month. ...

David Seddon reviews the extraordinary events in Zimbabwe, which saw the end of Mugabe's 37 year rule. Ordinary people of Zimbabwe, who have experienced decades of repression and hardship, are rejoicing and are optimistic, but very soon, Seddon argues, there must be a renewed, popular struggle for the future of Zimbabwe....

Recent protest in Togo have seen clashes with the police and a certain amount of street violence, but the scale has been unprecedented, with organisers claiming that as many as 800,000 people took to the streets across the country in August 2017. In the latest issue in the series David Seddon looks at the background to the latest wave of popular protests to rock West Africa. ...

David Seddon reviews the recent political and economic history of Niger. The country has long been one of the world’s largest uranium producers; supplying France with uranium ore for its nuclear industry. Since 2011, it has also started producing, refining and exporting oil. Output is currently around 20,000 barrels a day, which is about the same as its refining capacity. President Mahamadou Issoufou has recently announced that he would not amend the constitution to allow him to seek a third term after his second and final mandate ends in 2021....

In this issue of Popular Protest and Class Struggle in Africa, David Seddon reviews the most recent developments in four countries he has recently discussed – Gambia, Equatorial Guinea, Zimbabwe and the DRC – in all of which long-standing leaders have refused to stand down, in some cases against growing internal opposition and external pressure, but with significantly differing outcomes....

Hours before the deadline Senegal maintains its troops are ready to intervene if Gambia’s President Jammeh refuses to hand over power. Jammeh has replied that he would not be intimidated, and the regional body ECOWAS had no right to interfere in The Gambia's affairs. David Seddon looks at the elections last month and the current crisis....

For the latest update on the project Popular Protest and Social Movements for roape.net David Seddon examines the case of Zimbabwe, where President Robert Mugabe has faced a new kind of protest movement this year, and recent developments in the DRC, where President Kabila has attempted to bludgeon into silence opposition protesting against attempts to extend his mandate....

In the latest installment of the Popular Protest and Social Movements project for roape.net David Seddon looks at the case of Zimbabwe, where President Robert Mugabe is currently facing a new kind of protest movement, while recent developments in the DRC mean President Kabila has just been enabled to run for a third term....

In this wide-ranging critique of Firoze Manji's article on the failure of left movements in Africa, David Seddon writes that Manji's 'failure' implies falling short of something that could be identified as a ‘success’, which is an extraordinarily and unhelpfully binary approach to the study of class struggle, social movements and political change. ...