Interviews Archives - Page 2 of 3 - ROAPE
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Interviews

For roape.net Max Ajl interviews radical geographer and activist Habib Ayeb about food sovereignty, the peasantry in North Africa and film-making. Ayeb is a founder member of the Observatory of Food Sovereignty and Environment and Max Ajl is a sociologist, activist and an editor at Jadaliyya and Viewpoint. The interview was conducted on March 4, 2018, in Tunis, Tunisia....

In an interview with ROAPE’s Tunde Zack-Williams, roape.net asks about his background as a radical political economist who has written extensively on Sierra Leone. Zack focuses in the interview on the country’s recent history, it political parties, Blair’s intervention and the disasters of neoliberal reforms. The recent elections in Sierra Leone offer the poor little prospects of development or change....

In the latest interview for roape.net, Nigerian socialist Abiodun Olamosu talks about his early activism, the challenges for the radical left, Marxism and politics in contemporary Nigeria. He argues that there is a need to develop a real pro-poor alternative in the arena of mainstream electoral politics, and for the working class to mobilise across the country. ...

In this far-reaching interview, ROAPE’s Ray Bush argues that the products and commodities that rural people produce must sustain local demand and local needs, rather than produce export crops to generate foreign exchange on the international markets. The foundation of any modern society has to be the basis of generating sufficiently and appropriately priced food stuffs from local markets. This is the path, he argues, to a real alternative for societies in the Global South....

In a major interview ROAPE’s Hakim Adi discusses his work, activism and politics. Adi has spent year’s researching the African diaspora, Pan-Africanism and communism in the 20th century. On the anniversary of the 1917 revolution he explains that the significance of 1917 is not so much as how it helps us understand the past, or as a way of understanding Africa’s history, but rather that it shows that the alternative can be created in the present and future....

In an interview with ROAPE Explo Nani-Kofi looks at his involvement (and opposition) in the project of radical change briefly embarked on by Flight Lieutenant Jerry Rawlings in 1980s Ghana. After several years, left-wing opponents of the regime were imprisoned and at the same time the country became a test case for structural adjustment. Nani-Kofi describes his experiences....