Interviews Archives - ROAPE
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Interviews

In ROAPE’s final Connections workshop in Johannesburg in December last year we discussed the dynamics of resistance and transformation on the continent. In this blogpost we publish interviews with participants which provides an extraordinary account of the workshop and the struggles, politics and research of the activists who attended....

ROAPE’s Leo Zeilig interviews the Kenyan activist Gacheke Gachihi who is the coordinator of the Mathare Social Justice Centre in Nairobi, which organises campaigns against police brutality and killings. He speaks about the struggles over the last twenty five years against police brutality and extra-judicial killings in Nairobi and some of the organisations and social movements that are confronting the Kenyan state on this issue. Gacheke also introduces an extraordinary short documentary, just released, which charts the campaigns against these killings, from within Nairobi’s poorest settlements. ...

Sudanese activists in Europe continue to build solidarity for the revolutionary struggle that has, since mid-December, spread across Sudan. What are the dynamics of the uprising, and what is the role of the diaspora? For roape.net, Joe Hayns translates and introduces an interview with Mohamed El-Nour, an activist with the ‘Sudanese Revolutionaries and their Supporters in Marseille’ collective. ...

Max Ajl speaks to the Marxist economist Utsa Patnaik about agrarian history and imperialism. Her work on the economic history of India and other countries under colonial rule, shows how the experience deepened food insecurity and unemployment, trends which reemerged again under neoliberalism. The interview was conducted as part of the activities of the workshop on ‘Agriculture and Imperialism’ in November 2018, Beirut, Lebanon, organised by the Thimar Collective....

Tamás Szentes, Professor Emeritus of the Corvinus University of Budapest (the former Karl Marx University), elected full member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, is ‘one of the grand old men of development economics.’[1] His first celebrated book in English, The Political Economy of Underdevelopment (published first in 1971, republished in nine languages and ten different countries, totalling altogether 16 editions in the first fifteen years of publication) was praised in ROAPE in 1974 as ‘a serious and comprehensive attempt at providing a true political economy of underdevelopment.’ For a while he was one of the contributing editors of ROAPE, and between 1967 and 1971 worked together with ROAPE activists and researchers such as Lionel Cliffe, Peter Lawrence, John Saul, and Issa Shivji, at the University of Dar es Salaam. In an interview for roape.net Tamás Gerőcs asks Tamás Szentes about the years he spent...

On the anniversary of Steve Biko’s murder, ROAPE’s Remi Adekoya speaks to South African scholar and activist Mosa Phadi. Phadi reflects on the legacy of Biko’s radical and important thought, but also discusses how he did not consider cohesive alternatives that could now serve as a counter to neoliberal ideas. In a wide-ranging interview Phadi also looks at the political and economic crisis in South Africa, the Economic Freedom Fighters, the failures of the ANC and the possibilities of a solution in the militancy and consciousness of working-class struggle....

In an interview conducted in 2003, ROAPE’s Leo Zeilig spoke to Nelson Chamisa who was then the National Youth Chairperson of the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) In the early 2000s, the MDC was a very different organization, founded by a mass movement, with a large working-class membership many in the Zimbabwe Congress of Trade Unions (ZCTU). Now leader of the MDC, Chamisa promises his supporters victory in the elections and resistance if he does not win. In 2003 the 25-year-old organizer of a mass party, reflects on his own activism as a student militant, his hope for socialist change and the struggles against neo-liberal forces in the new party....

Remi Adekoya interviews Pascal Bianchini about Senegal’s street fighting years from 1968 to the mid-1970s. It was a period of growth for the revolutionary left and it forced a multi-party system on the government of Léopold Senghor, which at the time was not that usual in Africa. Bianchini argues that the democratisation in the country started in 1968 and was driven by the left, leading to major political changes in subsequent decades....

For roape.net Max Ajl interviews radical geographer and activist Habib Ayeb about food sovereignty, the peasantry in North Africa and film-making. Ayeb is a founder member of the Observatory of Food Sovereignty and Environment and Max Ajl is a sociologist, activist and an editor at Jadaliyya and Viewpoint. The interview was conducted on March 4, 2018, in Tunis, Tunisia....