Blog Archives - Page 6 of 11 - ROAPE
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For too long growth has not been seen for what it is: an ideology invented to defend capitalism. In this blog Franklin Obeng-Odoom looks at the consequences for Africa of this deception. He argues that economics has attained its imperial status not because of strong and rigorous methodology or even its better use of data, but, largely, because it serves an ideological role. It is this ideology that sustains the position of ‘economic science’....

In the forth in a series of blogs for roape.net, writer and activist Lee Wengraf explores China’s recent investment and engagement in Africa. China, she argues, is no kinder, gentler imperial option: just like 19th century colonialists, when the Chinese build roads and schools, the goal is to facilitate resource extraction and build allegiances. ...

Jointly published by Jacobin and ROAPE, David Seddon writes about Che Guevara's doomed, heroic mission to the Congo in 1965. Seddon argues that Che Guevara’s expedition in the Congo, though ill-fated, stands as a crucial example of anti-imperialist solidarity. In the blog-post Seddon charts the failures of the expedition and draws the lessons....

In this blog Mostafa Bassiouny and Anne Alexander assess the current state of the Egyptian workers’ movement and the potential for its revival. The workers’ movement remains, they argue, the most important potential location for effective popular resistance to the neoliberal policy agenda, reflecting organised workers’ capacity to paralyse sections of the economy and the state apparatus itself and the legacy of over a decade’s sustained experience in self-organisation. ...

In the third in a series of blogs for roape.net, writer and activist Lee Wengraf exposes some of the myths about corruption in Africa. The notion of “African corruption” persists despite the reality of widespread and established practices of illicit activity in the West, and, crucially, the contribution and culpability of Western corporations and governments to ‘African’ corruption....

Lee Wengraf unpicks the myths of Africa’s so-called 'resource curse', a term she argues that is profoundly ahistorical. Blaming a 'resource curse' purely on dictators and politicians, as many Western academics have argued, refuses to admit that the colonial pillage of Africa continues, now driven through trade rules, bilateral and multilateral arrangements, multinational companies and international agencies....