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Based on research on the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, Sophie Nakueira asks what the legacy of the Russian World Cup will be? She sees FIFA promoting the power and profit of global corporate brands such as Adidas, Nike, Coca-Cola and Anheuser-Busch. Can we justify spending vast amounts on such sporting extravaganzas in the name of global unity whilst simultaneously building walls and reinstating borders around the world? ...

As Donald Trump makes his first visit to the UK as president, Dirk Kohnert looks at how his policies will hit African countries. After years of talk of partnership for African economic development Trump’s tariffs mean a severe blow to African trade and sustainable development. Kohnert argues that Egypt and South Africa for example, potentially the most affected countries in Africa, face massive job losses....

In 1981 a radical journal was launched on the side of 'struggling people' and against so-called 'African socialism'. The Journal of African Marxists published articles, reviews and briefings but also organised conferences and local committees across the continent. The journal sought to 'to stimulate the debate on the correct path appropriate to the conditions of Africa.' David Seddon celebrates the eleven issues of an unusual and important forum for African Marxists that survived briefly more than three decades ago. ...

Early in the year Donald Trump described various South American, Caribbean and (apparently all) African countries as ‘shitholes’ during a meeting on immigration with senators in the White House. ROAPE’s Reginald Cline-Cole argues that the comment reminds us of the continued need to provide radical analyses of trends, issues and social processes in Africa, with a particular interest in class dynamics and social movements and the meaning of capitalism and imperialism. He hopes that the journal and the website will be read as a demonstration of the sustained vitality of Marxist analysis....

Arndt Hopfmann analyses the German government’s most recent Africa initiatives. Soon after Germany took over the G20-Presidency in November 2016 the Merkel government almost immediately announced that this was an opportunity to launch a new Africa orientation. However, Hopfmann sees in these initiatives official development aid, which is essentially taxpayer’s money, being converted into private gains for multinational investors. ...

Heike Becker writes about the many uprisings in Africa’s 1968 and that these protests and revolts highlight the fact that Africa should not be left blank on the map of scholarship that seeks to understand 1968 in a global perspective. Yet, these revolts and protests are still forgotten in the global discourse of commemoration. This week roape.net will focus on the extraordinary African dimensions of the movements in 1968....

Sophia Price writes that the post-Brexit UK-Commonwealth relationship is being idealised as the means for delivering shared economic and political gains, abstracted from the violence of its colonial history and relations of subordination and domination on which it rests. Price argues that the British state sees its future role after Brexit as facilitating the expansion of markets for finance. ...

This blogpost by Meera Sabaratnam is based on her recent book 'Decolonising Intervention: International Statebuilding in Mozambique', which argues that by challenging forms of received wisdom or analysis one may challenge the unjust distributions of power that underpin them. Sabaratnam challenges the Eurocentric habits of analysis have characterised much of the literature on international statebuilding, that focuses principally on the interveners while obscuring the interpretations and viewpoints of the intended recipients of intervention...

April marks the 25th anniversary of the deaths of Oliver Tambo and Chris Hani, though both men held very different visions for what transformation in South Africa ought to look like they found a home within the ANC. Alex Beresford argues that Tambo and Hani would have been disgusted by how patronage politics and corruption have generated internecine factionalism within the ANC and the wider alliance....