Blog Archives - Page 12 of 14 - ROAPE
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Blog

Luke Sinwell and Siphiwe Mbatha spent two years researching the contemporary mine-workers’ movement in South Africa and in their new book, The Spirit of Marikana: The Rise of Insurgent Trade Unionism in South Africa, they detail the creation of an alternative structure which was intended to hold the ‘new’ union, the Association of Mine-workers and Construction Union (AMCU), accountable to the rank and file. ...

Graham Harrison writes how Africa shows the world a future capitalism, one in which the social relations of production are far more extensively defined by contingency, violence, struggle, fraud, unfree labour, environmental pillage, and the politics of organised chaos. Capitalism is as resilient as it is unstable, but there is hope once the process of breaking it down begins. ...

Leo Zeilig's blog looks at the events that took place in Burkina Faso during and immediately after the military coup in September last year. The defeat of the coup was the result of extraordinary protests and popular struggles; Burkina Faso's second uprising in less than a year. ...

ROAPE’s Laura Mann discusses a recent workshop held at the London School of Economics on 3 May, which brought together leading economic geographers and political economists to discuss new prospects for industrialization and transformation in African countries in light of shifts in the global economy....

ROAPE's Leo Zeilig talks to Yao Graham about radical political economy in Africa, structural transformation and the legacy of neo-liberalism on the continent. In the short video clip included in the interview Graham speaks about the struggle for justice and change in Ghana. Graham is the co-ordinator of Third World Network in Accra, Ghana and the Africa Editor of ROAPE....

In October 2014 the World Bank presented its “South Africa Economic Update No 6” concluding: ‘The fiscal system is already achieving a lot of redistribution, and there is little space left in the government’s purse to do more to alleviate poverty and inequality via fiscal policy.’ The report became a part of the ideological foundation of the 2016/17 budget, which fell short of protecting 16 million South Africans from real cuts in their social grants. Dick Forslund exposes the fundamental errors in the report....