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Heike Becker writes about Claude Lanzmann’s close encounter with Frantz Fanon in 1961, and his fierce anti-colonial activism. Becker argues that we must remember the French filmmaker for more than his engagement with the European holocaust experience and his controversial support of Israel. Lanzmann took an ardent anti-colonialist stand against France’s colonial war in Algeria. ...

Yohannes Woldemariam discusses the major challenges confronting Ethiopia’s new Prime Minister, Abiy Ahmed. Tackling the deep structural weaknesses at the heart of Ethiopia’s economy and its so-called ‘revolutionary developmentalism’, will be a key test. Woldemariam also considers the country’s new relationship with Eritrea and the regional and international pressures playing out in Ethiopia’s new political landscape....

From the editorial to issue 156 of ROAPE, Peter Lawrence discusses articles that examine the state and global capitalism. Included in the issue are papers which look at how the colonial and post-colonial states in Malawi have pursued policies that have been in the interests of the tobacco industry, state capture in South Africa's motor industry and the history of capital controls. While the Debates section is devoted to the ROAPE/Third World Network workshop on radical political economy and industrialisation in Africa held in Accra last November. ...

In ground-breaking new research Torben Gülstorff argues that after 1945 both German states were involved in the events of decolonization and the Cold War in Africa and the rest of the 'Third World.' In the Central African region, they played a role in all major conflicts but neither state pursued high-minded policy but crude economic interests. Gülstorff argues that we must look beyond the typical powerhouses of Washington, Moscow, Peking, Paris or London to fill out the blank spaces on the map of world history. ...

Based on research on the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, Sophie Nakueira asks what the legacy of the Russian World Cup will be? She sees FIFA promoting the power and profit of global corporate brands such as Adidas, Nike, Coca-Cola and Anheuser-Busch. Can we justify spending vast amounts on such sporting extravaganzas in the name of global unity whilst simultaneously building walls and reinstating borders around the world? ...

As Donald Trump makes his first visit to the UK as president, Dirk Kohnert looks at how his policies will hit African countries. After years of talk of partnership for African economic development Trump’s tariffs mean a severe blow to African trade and sustainable development. Kohnert argues that Egypt and South Africa for example, potentially the most affected countries in Africa, face massive job losses....

In 1981 a radical journal was launched on the side of 'struggling people' and against so-called 'African socialism'. The Journal of African Marxists published articles, reviews and briefings but also organised conferences and local committees across the continent. The journal sought to 'to stimulate the debate on the correct path appropriate to the conditions of Africa.' David Seddon celebrates the eleven issues of an unusual and important forum for African Marxists that survived briefly more than three decades ago. ...

Early in the year Donald Trump described various South American, Caribbean and (apparently all) African countries as ‘shitholes’ during a meeting on immigration with senators in the White House. ROAPE’s Reginald Cline-Cole argues that the comment reminds us of the continued need to provide radical analyses of trends, issues and social processes in Africa, with a particular interest in class dynamics and social movements and the meaning of capitalism and imperialism. He hopes that the journal and the website will be read as a demonstration of the sustained vitality of Marxist analysis....

Arndt Hopfmann analyses the German government’s most recent Africa initiatives. Soon after Germany took over the G20-Presidency in November 2016 the Merkel government almost immediately announced that this was an opportunity to launch a new Africa orientation. However, Hopfmann sees in these initiatives official development aid, which is essentially taxpayer’s money, being converted into private gains for multinational investors. ...