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For most commentators and scholars, it was only events in the Global North that constituted ‘Global 1968’. None of the relevant overviews brings related events on the African continent to the fore. In a detailed account of popular protest across Africa in the 1960s, it becomes clear that the decade was vital for activists – as it was elsewhere across the world. 1968 was a crucial year for popular protests and student militancy on the continent. roape.net begins to fill in the blanks in the story of ‘1968’ in a global perspective. ...

Heike Becker writes about the many uprisings in Africa’s 1968 and that these protests and revolts highlight the fact that Africa should not be left blank on the map of scholarship that seeks to understand 1968 in a global perspective. Yet, these revolts and protests are still forgotten in the global discourse of commemoration. This week roape.net will focus on the extraordinary African dimensions of the movements in 1968....

Political economist Tamás Gerőcs discusses the relationship between Africa and Eastern Europe’s experience of socialist development raised at the recent ROAPE workshop in Dar es Salaam. He argues that across the world the left needs to develop a social critique of post-war developmentalism not only on a moral basis but economically and socially, to help us understand the neoliberal transformation, or counter-revolution....

In this blogpost roape.net publishes the first in a series of short interviews conducted at the ROAPE workshop held in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania (16-17 April, 2018). Over two days debates explored contemporary activism, resistance and research across the continent. We hope the posts on roape.net will continue the discussions started in Accra and Dar and draw in other voices....

David Seddon writes that seven years after the revolution many Tunisians have lost faith in the ‘democratic transition’ that they hoped would bring wider prosperity. This year a wave of popular protest broke out in the second week of January sparked by a package of tax increases after the government had received ‘a nudge’ from the IMF. At the height of the protests, it was estimated that tens of thousands of people were involved. Seddon examines the recent history of protest and struggle in Tunisia, the revolution in 2011, and the local elections held at the beginning of this month. ...

Responding to the debate on the changing nature of imperialism on roape.net, Walter Daum challenges Patrick Bond’s defence of David Harvey. Daum argues that while there is no question that the ‘East’ has gained relatively in wealth, this does not mean that there has been an epochal shift in the flow of value; it is extremely dubious that the directional flows of centuries have reversed and that the East, including China, is draining value from the West. ...

In a strong defence of Critical Agrarian Studies, Bettina Engels and Kristina Diez write that the approach offers analytical potential for the investigation of further dimensions of structural transformation in the countryside beyond the agrarian sector. Critical Agrarian Studies enables us to put the analysis of mining and related conflicts in a broader global historical context of commodity exploitation and frontier expansion....

Sophia Price writes that the post-Brexit UK-Commonwealth relationship is being idealised as the means for delivering shared economic and political gains, abstracted from the violence of its colonial history and relations of subordination and domination on which it rests. Price argues that the British state sees its future role after Brexit as facilitating the expansion of markets for finance. ...

This blogpost by Meera Sabaratnam is based on her recent book 'Decolonising Intervention: International Statebuilding in Mozambique', which argues that by challenging forms of received wisdom or analysis one may challenge the unjust distributions of power that underpin them. Sabaratnam challenges the Eurocentric habits of analysis have characterised much of the literature on international statebuilding, that focuses principally on the interveners while obscuring the interpretations and viewpoints of the intended recipients of intervention...