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Author: ROAPEadmin

In 1981 a radical journal was launched on the side of 'struggling people' and against so-called 'African socialism'. The Journal of African Marxists published articles, reviews and briefings but also organised conferences and local committees across the continent. The journal sought to 'to stimulate the debate on the correct path appropriate to the conditions of Africa.' David Seddon celebrates the eleven issues of an unusual and important forum for African Marxists that survived briefly more than three decades ago. ...

Early in the year Donald Trump described various South American, Caribbean and (apparently all) African countries as ‘shitholes’ during a meeting on immigration with senators in the White House. ROAPE’s Reginald Cline-Cole argues that the comment reminds us of the continued need to provide radical analyses of trends, issues and social processes in Africa, with a particular interest in class dynamics and social movements and the meaning of capitalism and imperialism. He hopes that the journal and the website will be read as a demonstration of the sustained vitality of Marxist analysis....

Arndt Hopfmann analyses the German government’s most recent Africa initiatives. Soon after Germany took over the G20-Presidency in November 2016 the Merkel government almost immediately announced that this was an opportunity to launch a new Africa orientation. However, Hopfmann sees in these initiatives official development aid, which is essentially taxpayer’s money, being converted into private gains for multinational investors. ...

Remi Adekoya reviews a new book on the exploitation and underdevelopment of Africa. Extracting Profits by Lee Wengraf is a treasure-trove of facts and figures about Africa for anyone interested in the political economy of Africa’s past, present and future. However, Adekoya argues that for any systemic change to occur on the continent there must be a shift in the mind-set of those in charge, otherwise all that will be achieved is the replacement of one set of looters by another, only this time holding up different slogans....

Esteban Mora argues that the debate on roape.net between David Harvey and John Smith is flawed. We should not only be looking for a connection between ‘drained’ countries and countries who ‘drain’ others, but also a relationship of mutual profiting between an international bourgeoisie. Mora argues that dependency theories which underpins the debate are partial and cannot capture the totality of relationships in the international market, nor the operations of imperialism....

In a contribution to the roape.net debate on imperialism, Andy Higginbottom argues that the neo-colonial form of imperialism underpins elite corruption in the Global South. He asks if eurocentric Marxism can continue to deny the fact that capitalist imperialism involves the systemic plunder of the working class in the Global South?...

Abiodun Olamosu reviews the classic 1975 book, Economic Development of Nigeria: The Socialist Alternative by Ola Oni and Bade Onimode which will soon be republished. Oni and Onimode wrote about the underdevelopment of Nigeria and how the people were made poor. They also provided a programme for the country’s development which included the disengagement from international capitalism, the introduction of democratic planning, public ownership and control of the means of production, distribution and exchange. Olamosu provides a critical introduction to the book. ...

Amber Murrey and Edith Phaswana write about a conference in Ibadan marking the contribution of the scholar Toyin Falola. Falola’s work transcends disciplinary boundaries, appealing to researchers and students across different backgrounds and disciplines. Murrey and Phaswana explain that Falola has been at the forefront of charting a path for African intellectuals and validating humanizing accounts of African history....

Bettina Engels reviews a new book that traces the history of Burkina Faso’s student movement. The book by Lila Chouli demonstrates how the movement's development is closely connected with the general political struggles in the country and how organised students have positioned themselves in opposition to the state and ruling elite and questioned the very political and economic system itself....