ROAPEadmin, Author at ROAPE - Page 3 of 28
1
archive,paged,author,author-roapeadmin,author-1,paged-3,author-paged-3,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-child-theme-ver-1.0.0,qode-theme-ver-16.8,qode-theme-bridge,qode_header_in_grid,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.5.2,vc_responsive

Author: ROAPEadmin

From the editorial to issue 156 of ROAPE, Peter Lawrence discusses articles that examine the state and global capitalism. Included in the issue are papers which look at how the colonial and post-colonial states in Malawi have pursued policies that have been in the interests of the tobacco industry, state capture in South Africa's motor industry and the history of capital controls. While the Debates section is devoted to the ROAPE/Third World Network workshop on radical political economy and industrialisation in Africa held in Accra last November. ...

In ground-breaking new research Torben Gülstorff argues that after 1945 both German states were involved in the events of decolonization and the Cold War in Africa and the rest of the 'Third World.' In the Central African region, they played a role in all major conflicts but neither state pursued high-minded policy but crude economic interests. Gülstorff argues that we must look beyond the typical powerhouses of Washington, Moscow, Peking, Paris or London to fill out the blank spaces on the map of world history. ...

In an interview conducted in 2003, ROAPE’s Leo Zeilig spoke to Nelson Chamisa who was then the National Youth Chairperson of the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) In the early 2000s, the MDC was a very different organization, founded by a mass movement, with a large working-class membership many in the Zimbabwe Congress of Trade Unions (ZCTU). Now leader of the MDC, Chamisa promises his supporters victory in the elections and resistance if he does not win. In 2003 the 25-year-old organizer of a mass party, reflects on his own activism as a student militant, his hope for socialist change and the struggles against neo-liberal forces in the new party....

The Editorial Working Group of Review of African Political Economy (ROAPE) is pleased to announce the 2017 winner of the Ruth First prize. The prize is awarded for the best article published by an African author in the journal in a publication year. This year, the prize was awarded to Papa Faye for his article The Politics of Recognition, and the Manufacturing of Citizenship and Identity in Senegal's Decentralised Charcoal Market. The ROAPE Prize Committee commented on Faye's article: ‘the fieldwork contribution was impressive, as was the broader engagement with literature on identity politics and recognition. The paper’s discussion of how national policies (however they were conceived) were shaped within the local political economy was sensitively done, and very interesting.’ The article shows how state politics of (re)allocation of rights and resources to social groups within a society (recognition) are constructive of distinct abilities to shape the fate of the political...

In a reply to Esteban Mora’s contribution to the imperialism debate on roape.net, Walter Daum writes that the claim that the drain of value from South to North has been inverted, reversed, or merely leveled off flies in the face of reality. Daum argues that the Northern imperialists exploit the labour and resources of the South and this is all the more true today....

Remi Adekoya interviews Pascal Bianchini about Senegal’s street fighting years from 1968 to the mid-1970s. It was a period of growth for the revolutionary left and it forced a multi-party system on the government of Léopold Senghor, which at the time was not that usual in Africa. Bianchini argues that the democratisation in the country started in 1968 and was driven by the left, leading to major political changes in subsequent decades....

Based on research on the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, Sophie Nakueira asks what the legacy of the Russian World Cup will be? She sees FIFA promoting the power and profit of global corporate brands such as Adidas, Nike, Coca-Cola and Anheuser-Busch. Can we justify spending vast amounts on such sporting extravaganzas in the name of global unity whilst simultaneously building walls and reinstating borders around the world? ...

As Donald Trump makes his first visit to the UK as president, Dirk Kohnert looks at how his policies will hit African countries. After years of talk of partnership for African economic development Trump’s tariffs mean a severe blow to African trade and sustainable development. Kohnert argues that Egypt and South Africa for example, potentially the most affected countries in Africa, face massive job losses....

In important new research on Egypt, Marion Dixon explains that the corporate food system in the country has involved Egyptians across classes buying into the neoliberal project. The space of dietary convergence provided a social consensus that legitimized the neoliberal project, at least temporarily. Yet, its fundamental failure was that the growth of corporate food did little to reduce food costs as a percentage of income for the vast majority of Egyptians....