ROAPEadmin, Author at ROAPE - Page 3 of 27
1
archive,paged,author,author-roapeadmin,author-1,paged-3,author-paged-3,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-child-theme-ver-1.0.0,qode-theme-ver-16.7,qode-theme-bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.5.2,vc_responsive

Author: ROAPEadmin

Esteban Mora argues that the debate on roape.net between David Harvey and John Smith is flawed. We should not only be looking for a connection between ‘drained’ countries and countries who ‘drain’ others, but also a relationship of mutual profiting between an international bourgeoisie. Mora argues that dependency theories which underpins the debate are partial and cannot capture the totality of relationships in the international market, nor the operations of imperialism....

In a contribution to the roape.net debate on imperialism, Andy Higginbottom argues that the neo-colonial form of imperialism underpins elite corruption in the Global South. He asks if eurocentric Marxism can continue to deny the fact that capitalist imperialism involves the systemic plunder of the working class in the Global South?...

Abiodun Olamosu reviews the classic 1975 book, Economic Development of Nigeria: The Socialist Alternative by Ola Oni and Bade Onimode which will soon be republished. Oni and Onimode wrote about the underdevelopment of Nigeria and how the people were made poor. They also provided a programme for the country’s development which included the disengagement from international capitalism, the introduction of democratic planning, public ownership and control of the means of production, distribution and exchange. Olamosu provides a critical introduction to the book. ...

Amber Murrey and Edith Phaswana write about a conference in Ibadan marking the contribution of the scholar Toyin Falola. Falola’s work transcends disciplinary boundaries, appealing to researchers and students across different backgrounds and disciplines. Murrey and Phaswana explain that Falola has been at the forefront of charting a path for African intellectuals and validating humanizing accounts of African history....

Bettina Engels reviews a new book that traces the history of Burkina Faso’s student movement. The book by Lila Chouli demonstrates how the movement's development is closely connected with the general political struggles in the country and how organised students have positioned themselves in opposition to the state and ruling elite and questioned the very political and economic system itself....

For most commentators and scholars, it was only events in the Global North that constituted ‘Global 1968’. None of the relevant overviews brings related events on the African continent to the fore. In a detailed account of popular protest across Africa in the 1960s, it becomes clear that the decade was vital for activists – as it was elsewhere across the world. 1968 was a crucial year for popular protests and student militancy on the continent. roape.net begins to fill in the blanks in the story of ‘1968’ in a global perspective. ...

Heike Becker writes about the many uprisings in Africa’s 1968 and that these protests and revolts highlight the fact that Africa should not be left blank on the map of scholarship that seeks to understand 1968 in a global perspective. Yet, these revolts and protests are still forgotten in the global discourse of commemoration. This week roape.net will focus on the extraordinary African dimensions of the movements in 1968....

Political economist Tamás Gerőcs discusses the relationship between Africa and Eastern Europe’s experience of socialist development raised at the recent ROAPE workshop in Dar es Salaam. He argues that across the world the left needs to develop a social critique of post-war developmentalism not only on a moral basis but economically and socially, to help us understand the neoliberal transformation, or counter-revolution....