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Author: ROAPEadmin

In this article, Vassilis Fouskas explains the current debt crisis in Greece and seeks to open a dialogue with the developing countries of the Global South (Africa, Latin America, Asia), all of which have faced, or are currently facing, debt problems. The article examines the lessons and possibilities for radical projects in other parts of the world. We hope this will generate a debate about experiments in Africa that have attempted to construct an alternative politics....

Workers involved in marine transport (on the waterfront and at sea) have a particularly long and deep history of interest in and solidarity with fellow workers across the proverbial seven seas. In this blog Peter Limb and Peter Cole look at the role of dockworkers and seamen in relation to the freedom struggle against apartheid South Africa....

Sam Moyo, who died in car accident in India on 21 November, was a longstanding member and contributor to ROAPE and co-founder and Executive Director of the African Institute for Agrarian Studies (AIAS) in Harare. Here we post three tributes to Sam. A selection of his ROAPE articles can be found here. Celebrating a Life By Tendai Murisa On Saturday night at approximately 11:45pm Beijing time I received a call from an old friend informing me that Prof Sam Moyo had been involved in a high impact accident in New Delhi and we should pray. I didn’t. For some reason I just felt powerless and all I could do was sing songs of praise but could not sleep, then within the same hour the message came. Sam is no more. Shattered! I did not want to believe it. My or rather our world had just turned upside down....

Abiodun Olamosu and Andy Wynne review Africa: Why the Economist Got it Wrong. They argue that the book provides a critical review of the recent economic history of Africa. Morten Jerven argues that, for most of the past two decades, mainstream economists have been trying to explain the chronic failure of economic growth in Africa. They have largely failed....

The first essay in our special issue on Radical Agendas in South Africa argues that the liberation struggle that culminated in 1994 and saw the emergence of a formally democratic South Africa and a population apparently liberated from oppression and, theoretically, from penury, has not been, in its essentials, so very liberatory after all. In subsequent essays, Vishwas Satgar, Shireen Hassim and others write about South Africa's radical possibilities....

Femi Aborisade asks what is the root cause of the pervasive poverty across Africa. In this blog he argues that we have a duty to continue to explain that there is a relationship between poverty and politics. Framing these questions within a radical political economy analysis remains vital. With a focus on Nigeria the blog looks at the sort of political agenda that needs to be adopted to reverse the continents underdevelopment....

In this blog Hannah Cross argues that we need to overcome the illusion that clandestine immigration is a choice - something to be liked or disliked, or that it is positive or negative, rather than an inevitable and sometimes tragic outcome of the predatory nature of the world economy. The promotion of counter-narratives, solidarity and defence of migrants goes to the heart of democratic struggle....