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Author: ROAPEadmin

In the forth essay in the series Radical Agendas in South Africa, writer and academic Shireen Hassim writes that economic policy debates simply pay lip-service to the gendered forms of production and reproduction, leaving these connections to be made by the small number of overburdened feminist activists. It is a rare event when there is attention to gender dimensions of inequality in the writings of the male left....

In this obituary of the academic John Peel, Caroline Ifeka writes how unlike post-modern scholars of religion and change whose cultural constructionism apparently exists in a bubble, floating freely in the writer’s head unanchored to the people in question, John’s analyses were soundly embedded in and integrated with ethnographically rich empirical data....

Poursuivant notre collaboration avec Afriques en Lutte, Bruno Jaffré écrit que le Burkina a voté pour d’anciens proches de Blaise Compaoré renversé pourtant à la suite d’une puissante insurrection populaire. Cela, Jaffré écrit, peut paraitre paradoxal mais ce résultat est pourtant logique en regard de la réalité de la situation politique du pays. ...

Miles Larmer reviews Lara Pawson's In the Name of the People, seeing in the book an exploration of the disillusionment with African national liberation. These are lessons, Miles writes, that continue to be highly instructive for many of us today...

In the third installment of our series Radical Agendas in South Africa, Eddie Webster asks if left activists in the labour movement have the political imagination and energy to take advantage of the new terrain that has opened in recent years. What is clear, he writes, is that the old labour order is no longer sustainable ...