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'The revolution won't be televised' is a film that tells the story of the ‘Y’en a marre’ movement that rose up in Senegal against octogenarian President Abdoulaye Wade’s attempt to clinch to power in 2012. Y’en a marre translates as ‘enough is enough’, or – even more to the point – ‘we’re fed up’. The movement was started by musicians Thiat and Kilifeu, and some of their friends. ...

ROAPE Online is shocked and saddened by the news about the murder of Giulio Regeni, an activist and a PhD student at Cambridge University working on the Egyptian new labour movement. Giulio’s murder is a stark reminder of both the dangers and the importance of research which is politically committed to economic and social justice. ...

Writer and activist Khadija Sharife describes the devastating practice of platinum price fixing. She sees how the role of the market in Africa as ‘sole regulator’ of value is kept in place for its fictive neutrality, its political-economic usefulness in not ‘seeing’ and therefore disguising socio-economic conflicts and injustices....

Patrick Bond writes how the World Bank is blinded by its own dogma and unable to see the extent of South African poverty.To do so would violate the Bank’s foundational doctrine, that states the central problems of poverty can be solved by applying market logic. It is only by breaking with the logic of the market that real gains can be made for South Africa's poor....

In a far-reaching analysis of the struggles taking place in South Africa, Jonathan Grossman writes that the student mobilisations have directly challenged the myth of the rainbow nation. Grossman also challenges a narrative that says students did for workers what workers could not do for themselves, in fact there is a deep solidarity between workers and students and this is the real spirit of Marikana....

South African writer and academic Heike Becker looks at South Africa's extraordinary student movement that in 2015 brought down symbols of colonialism and exploitation, fought against fee increases in higher education and called for the end of racism and of neo-liberal outsourcing practices of support services at universities. She asks if this was South Africa's 1968. ...

Over the last three years Ben Radley has been working on a documentary, We Will Win Peace, which is a critique of campaigns often led by western advocacy groups on ‘conflict minerals’ in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, with their dominant narrative that has placed western consumers at the heart of the solution. In this blog Ben unpicks some of the issues involved. ...

In the first of a two part article on the struggle of Mozambique’s workers and poor, Judith Marshall writes about the experiment in radical transformation in the first years of the country’s independence after 1975. However the tragic slide in the 1980s into the arms of the IMF and World Bank saw the adoption of structural adjustment. Marshall charts the birth of new protest movements against the government and international capital....

In Thandi Dlamini's report on mining in South Africa she writes how more than twenty years after democracy women make up only 11% of the operational mining workforce in South Africa. Before 1994, underground work was exclusively for males. This report assesses the possible side effects of the mining industry’s apparent new found enthusiasm for female employees. ...

Meredeth Turshen reviews a recent exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan entitled, Kongo: Power and Majesty. She marvels at the extraordinary artistic production of Kongo society and asks, why were the Africans who created these instruments not honored as contemporaries of Michelangelo? Why didn’t Europeans regard the Kongo civilization as comparable to the Renaissance? Why did they reduce Africans to raw human labour?...