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Author: ROAPEadmin

ROAPE’s Tunde Zack-Williams provides a detailed background to the war in Sierra Leone that led to British intervention in 2000, he then introduces Lionel Cliffe's paper on Tony Blair's involvement in the country in 2000 which roape.net publishes for the first time. As Zack-Williams concludes, ‘Lionel’s paper … questions: in whose interests do we intervene in conflicts in foreign land? Are we in a position to always tell the good guys from the bad guys?’...

In the first of a two-part blog post Liliane Mouan looks to the restructuring of the Angolan oil sector and state oil company Sonangol. The country retains the image of an oil kleptocracy, with the fate of Sonangol tied to a political dynasty. This blog asks what do these reforms tell us about political-economic change in Angola?...

Luke Sinwell and Siphiwe Mbatha spent two years researching the contemporary mine-workers’ movement in South Africa and in their new book, The Spirit of Marikana: The Rise of Insurgent Trade Unionism in South Africa, they detail the creation of an alternative structure which was intended to hold the ‘new’ union, the Association of Mine-workers and Construction Union (AMCU), accountable to the rank and file. ...

In this report on an important workshop held at Jimma University in Ethiopia, the authors look at the opportunities for the decolonization of knowledge. This detailed reflection holds important lessons and examples for readers of roape.net, who share a commitment to radical and critical scholarship of and from the continent and who are likewise immersed in decolonizing projects in their respective spaces and institutions. ...

Carin Runciman reports on a recent workshop that focused on protests in South Africa. Based on research conducted by the Research Chair in Social Change she shows that these protests are not just about service delivery, but amount to a rebellion of the poor. However, to what extent can these protests break from the politics of the ANC and form a progressive movement for social change?...

In the fourth article in series on popular protests and social movements in Africa, David Seddon extends his comparison by examining three more Africa countries or territories in which the head of state has exceeded two decades in power. Seddon considers the political dynamics that have allowed this to occur, examining the popular response to what might be seen as a gradual slide towards de facto and often de jure one party states and dictatorships in these countries....

Neoliberal policies, reforms, ideas, social relations and practices have engendered a type of socio-cultural change across Africa (and the world) which is facilitating widespread fraud. In a new volume just published, editors Jörg Wiegratz and David Whyte and their contributing scholars explore the moral worlds of fraud in different social and geographical settings, and illustrates how contemporary fraud is not the outcome of just a few 'bad apples'....

Graham Harrison writes how Africa shows the world a future capitalism, one in which the social relations of production are far more extensively defined by contingency, violence, struggle, fraud, unfree labour, environmental pillage, and the politics of organised chaos. Capitalism is as resilient as it is unstable, but there is hope once the process of breaking it down begins. ...

Leo Zeilig's blog looks at the events that took place in Burkina Faso during and immediately after the military coup in September last year. The defeat of the coup was the result of extraordinary protests and popular struggles; Burkina Faso's second uprising in less than a year. ...