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Author: ROAPEadmin

In this blog Mostafa Bassiouny and Anne Alexander assess the current state of the Egyptian workers’ movement and the potential for its revival. The workers’ movement remains, they argue, the most important potential location for effective popular resistance to the neoliberal policy agenda, reflecting organised workers’ capacity to paralyse sections of the economy and the state apparatus itself and the legacy of over a decade’s sustained experience in self-organisation. ...

In the third in a series of blogs for roape.net, writer and activist Lee Wengraf exposes some of the myths about corruption in Africa. The notion of “African corruption” persists despite the reality of widespread and established practices of illicit activity in the West, and, crucially, the contribution and culpability of Western corporations and governments to ‘African’ corruption....

In the latest interview for roape.net, Nigerian socialist Abiodun Olamosu talks about his early activism, the challenges for the radical left, Marxism and politics in contemporary Nigeria. He argues that there is a need to develop a real pro-poor alternative in the arena of mainstream electoral politics, and for the working class to mobilise across the country. ...

In this moving tribute to the writer and teacher Barbara Harlow who has recently died, Christopher J. Lee looks at the work of a women who dared to treat dispersed worlds, such as Palestine, El Salvador, Northern Ireland, and South Africa within a single framework. Harlow wrote about the conditions of political injustice, literature and liberation, writing with passion and commitment about the South African revolutionary Ruth First. ...

In this far-reaching interview, ROAPE’s Ray Bush argues that the products and commodities that rural people produce must sustain local demand and local needs, rather than produce export crops to generate foreign exchange on the international markets. The foundation of any modern society has to be the basis of generating sufficiently and appropriately priced food stuffs from local markets. This is the path, he argues, to a real alternative for societies in the Global South....

In a new book on the neoliberal moral economy in Africa, Jörg Wiegratz writes how there has been a high intensity of moral-economic interference of foreign, especially Western actors to promote a particular capitalist moral order in contemporary African societies. In this blog-post introducing his book, Wiegratz argues that the moral economy of a country is not just made by domestic but also foreign forces, and, that given morals are in many ways an outcome of politics....